1942-48 HAZEL PECK NÉE WOODS

2oz of butter put in one’s own personal dish to last the week. Being a prefect in the prefects’ sit (or was it “Little Sit”?) and eating 12 slices of bread for tea on a Sunday. Putting salt and pepper on bread because there was nothing else. The great excitement of sitting on the steps – Polly always joining in if she was there – and clapping when the victorious teams had to run down the drive to the front door. Mrs. Smith (Deputy Housemistress for a short time) greeting us all with “Alleleuja” on Easter Sunday when we had to stay at school for Easter one year – we were all open-mouthed!

The embarrassing and ghastly fact that we had 2 jumpers and one corduroy dress to last the whole term. For “developing” girls before the age of even “Odor-o-no” this was the most ghastly situation. One was all too aware that one “stank” and there was nothing that one could do. (Why oh why didn’t one’s Housemistress suggest that the jumpers could be washed?) My parents never visited except during the summer term so I couldn’t ask them.

Saving up the peel from the oranges, that as children we were allowed on our rations, and sending them to my parents to make marmalade. Polly reading to us as we sat in her study on the floor knitting missionary garments or darning our stockings.

Whoever was it – and you will remember Jill – who was half French and as a dormitory prefect, in the dormitory over the bridge, taught us the Marseillaise after lights out? In our dormitories we all had our own individual wash stands and in the winter the water invariably froze over in the cold water jugs and one’s flannel was frozen into a solid square by the morning.

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